World News

Half of Gloucestershire primary schools have no male teachers

by Ellis LaneSenior Digital Reporter
Half of all primary schools in Gloucestershire have no male teachers.

New analysis of school workforce figures has revealed that 52 primary schools in Gloucestershire have an all-female teaching staff.

Excluding schools where the gender split of teachers is not available, that works out as 50 per cent of all primaries in our area.

Nursery Management: International - Men of the world

by Meredith Jones Russell - NurseryWorld
Achieving real gender balance in the early years continues to flummox countries across the world. On average in OECD countries, just 3.2 per cent of pre-primary teachers are male, with the rate lower than 1 per cent in most of Eastern Europe, Israel and Portugal.

Australian man speaks about his aim to see more men working in ECEC

by Freya Lucas - The Sector - Australia
Australia's ECEC sector is dominated by female employees with statistics from the Australian Government revealing that less than 3 per cent of all employees in the sector are male.

Gender Balance - European Early Childhood Education Research Association (EECERA)

For some years now, researchers from several countries have formed an international network on the issue of men, women and gender balance in the ECEC work force. Since 2010, members of the network organised research symposia on the annual conferences of EECERA. 2012, the network initiated a Special Interest Group within EECERA.

Principal loves teaching pre-schoolers, takes lead in skills upgrade with pursuit of master's

by Goh Yan Han - Singapore - The Straits Times
When he first started teaching at a pre-school, even the parents of the children enrolled there were curious as to why a man would take up the job.

"Some of them would ask me 'Men can join this job?' or 'Why didn't you teach primary school instead?'" said Mr Mohammad Aizat Hashim, 31, who is now a principal, at Mosaic Kindergarten.

Inequality in day-care centres: Male educators are more likely to work temporary

Many parents and educators want more male professionals in day-care centres and kindergartens – however, men have greater difficulty to get into daycare centers in permanent employment. This is the result of a new study of the Delta-Institute for Social – ecological research.

Scotland: Course launched in Moray to encourage men to consider career in childcare

by David Mackay - The Press and Journal - Scotland
A course is being launched in the north of Scotland specifically aimed at encouraging men to consider a career in childcare.

Now Moray College UHI in Elgin has teamed up with the council to provide a course to meet the surge in demand.

It is hoped that the initiative will tap into people considering a change in career and parents who want to return to work.

England: Why it’s hard being a male primary teacher

By Adam Black - TES
Men in primary schools put up with unfair comments about their health, appearance and career progress, says this teacher.

More diversity called for in New Zealand's classrooms - but it's not everything

by Christina Persico - NZ Stuff
Sean Dillon is a Pākeha male - but he's in the minority.

He is a school teacher - a field where three-quarters of the population are female.

New Zealand has 55,020 registered teachers, as at April 2017 - 40,819 of these are women. That is almost three times the 14,201 male teachers educating our children.

Men who care: attracting men into the caring professions

At the same time as efforts rightly focus on getting more women in leadership positions and into male-dominated industries, there is also a movement to encourage more men into the careers dominated by women.

In particular, the caring professions are bereft of men. Early years teaching and nursery workers are almost exclusively female, as is nursing and the social care workforce.

This is despite the fact that vulnerable people sometimes request the same gender care for them because of the intimate nature of the relationship.
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